enrolment- spring 2016


[PDF]enrolment- spring 2016 - Rackcdn.comhttps://4d2da0da4e8a0f8ec6ab-aacfababc729cd49a24606938417f53d.ssl.cf6.rackcdn...

10 downloads 155 Views 817KB Size

1

ENROLMENT- SPRING 2016

2 \

Please note that students are solely responsible for ensuring they meet graduation requirements. Each program has different requirements, clearly listed in this document. FIC offers many enrolment support options including: • Enrolment email assistance: [email protected] • One-to-one advising sessions available from 8 a.m.-6 p.m. most days • Faculty-specific advising sessions offered once per term (see portal for dates) Make an appointment with advising if you have any questions, or if you intend to change programs.

3

TABLE OF CONTENTS SEMESTER AND EXAMINATION DATES ............................................... 4 SPRING SEMESTER (201601) CALENDAR ......................................... 5 UTPI COURSE SELECTIONS .......................................................................... 6 CORNERSTONE PROGRAM COURSE SELECTIONS ....................... 8 INTEGRATED PROGRAM COURSE SELECTIONS ............................ 8 ARTS & SOCIAL SCIENCES COURSE SELECTIONS ...................... 9 BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION COURSE SELECTIONS ............. 11 COMMUNICATION, ARTS & TECHNOLOGY COURSE SELECTIONS .......................................................................................................................................... 13 ENGINEERING SCIENCE COURSE SELECTIONS .......................... 17 ENGINEERING SCIENCE COURSE SELECTIONS (MECHATRONICS).............................................................................................. 18 FACULTY OF ENVIRONMENT (BA) COURSE SELECTIONS ... 20 FACULTY OF ENVIRONMENT (BSC) COURSE SELECTIONS 22 HEALTH SCIENCES (BA) COURSE SELECTIONS .......................... 24 ASSOCIATE OF ARTS DEGREE COURSE SELECTIONS ............. 26 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ............................................................................... 29 ENROLMENT STEPS ........................................................................................... 48 ENROLMENT FAQS ............................................................................................. 53 WQB REQUIREMENTS ..................................................................................... 57

4

FRASER INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE Semester and Examination Dates

2016 Academic Year Spring Semester (201601) 4 January (Mon) 5 January (Tues) March 16 (Wed) April 5 (Tues) April 7(Thur)

Orientation (for new students) Spring Term classes commence Tuition Deadline for Summer Classes end Examination period begins

18 April (Mon)

Examination period ends

19 April (Tues)

Inter Semester Break begins

Summer Semester (201602) 6 May (Fri) 9 May (Mon) 20 July (Wed) 8 August (Mon) August 10 (Wed)

Orientation (for new students) Spring Term classes commence Tuition Deadline for Fall Classes end Examination period begins

19 August (Fri)

Examination period ends

20 August (Sat)

Inter Semester Break begins

60 Fall Semester (201603) 3 2 September (Fri) 6 September (Tues) 5 December (Mon) 7 December (Wed) 18 December (Sun)

Orientation (for new students) Fall Term classes commence Classes end Examination period begins Examination period ends

19 December (Mon)

Inter Semester Break begins.

Semester & Examination dates are subject to change without notice.

5

Spring (201601) Calendar

Week No.

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

1

2

3

WEEK 1

4Orientation

5-Classes Start

6

7

8

9

10

WEEK 2

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

WEEK 3

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

WEEK 4

25

26

27

28

29 Last Day to Drop Classes with Refund

30

31

WEEK 5

1 - Feb

2

3

4

5

6

7

WEEK 6

8

9

10

11

12 Last Day to Drop Classes no Refund

13

14

WEEK 7

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

WEEK 8

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

WEEK 9

29

1 - March

2

3

4

5

6

WEEK 10

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

WEEK 11

14

15

16 – Tuition Deadline for Summer

17

18

19

20

WEEK 12

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

WEEK 13

28

29

30

31

1 - April

2

3

WEEK 14

4

5 – Classes End

6

7 – Exam Period Begins

8

9

10

WEEK 15

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

WEEK 16

18 – Exam Period Ends

19 – Semester Break Begins

20

21

22

23

24

6

UTPI COURSE SELECTIONS At the UTP I level, students may choose from a range of courses which are designed to prepare students for university-level studies. Students need a grade of D or better in 8 subjects and a GPA of 2.5 to progress to Stage 2: • • • • • • • • • • • •

BUS108 – Business Management COM001 – Introduction to Computing Concepts & Algorithms COM002 – Introduction to Computers & Their Applications ECN100 – Introduction to Economics ESR100 – English Skills / Reading IUW100 – Introduction to University Writing MTH099 – Beginning with Algebra MTH101 – Introduction to Mathematics MTH103 – Foundations of Mathematics PHL120 – An Introduction to Philosophical Reasoning UNI101 – University Life WIS100 – World Issues

Students must complete 8 courses, with a GPA of 2.5, including required subjects in English; university life; and math depending on their program choice. You can progress to UTPII after completing UNI101, IUW100/ESR, one math class, and three additional courses, based on your UTPII stream. Select your electives based on the program you are planning to attend in Stage 2 and see an advisor for assistance with course selection. Please note that not all courses are offered every semester.

7

UTP I suggested class combinations are outlined below. BOLDED RED COURSES ARE HIGHLY RECOMMENDED: BOLDED COURSES = RECOMMENDED PATHWAY Stage I Arts and Social Sciences/Communications, Art, and Technology/ Environment/Health Science ESR100 IUW100 MATH099 UNI101

WIS100

BUS108 COM001 COM002 MATH101 MATH103 MATH099 PHIL120

Stage I Business Administration

Highly Recommended ESR100 IUW100 MATH101 MATH103 UNI101 Recommended BUS108 COM002 ECN100 PHIL120 Electives COM001 MATH099 WIS100

Stage I Computing Science/Engineering Science

COM001 ESR100 IUW100 MATH101 MATH103 UNI101 COM002

BUS108 ECN100 MTH099 PHIL120 WIS100

70% JUMP RULE Students who have completed 12 years of study in their home country may be eligible to “Jump” to UTPII if they successfully complete four UTPI classes with a minimum 70% average. The determination is made at the time of admission and will be mentioned on the students Letter of Offer, if the student is eligible for this exemption.

8

CORNERSTONE PROGRAM COURSE SELECTIONS • •

CNST101 – Cornerstone Academic Program CNQS101- Cornerstone Quantitative Survey Course

The Cornerstone course will allow students the extra opportunity to develop skills and integrate more fully into their new study environment at FIC. Cornerstone is also streamlined into FIC current programs to ensure students learn the most essential skills for their academic success. Cornerstone students will develop skills in relationship to other course offerings at FIC. Students may not defer in their first semester of study. Students who fail the Cornerstone program MAY RETAKE the course up to one time. Cornerstone students who fail the Cornerstone program twice will be required to withdraw. If a student is required to only retake CNQS there is a $500.00 fee

To pass, students must: Attend at minimum 80% of classes Receive at least a 60% total on the above components Get at least 50% on final projects/examinations

INTEGRATED PROGRAM COURSE SELECTIONS • • •

INTG100 – Integrated Academic Program ILS101- Integrated Learning Skills Two additional Stage 1 or Stage 2 academic courses

Students may not defer in their first semester of study. Students who fail the Integrated program MAY RETAKE the course up to one time. Integrated students who fail the English program twice will be required to withdraw, regardless of their academic achievements in content courses. Please note that students completing the Integrated Program are also subject to any pre-requisite and co-requisite requirements associated with FIC classes. *Students may be required to take ALC099 if they do not achieve the required results in INTG100.

9

ARTS & SOCIAL SCIENCES COURSE SELECTIONS Students must complete their program with at least one ‘W’ and one ‘Q’ course; and a grade of C- or better in all courses. All (direct) students are required to take (and pass) ILS101 – Integrated Learning Skills and ALC099 – Academic Literacy Course in their first term of study unless exempted*. REQUIRED COURSES: Choose at least seven (7) courses from the following list: ARCH100- Ancient Peoples and Places CRIM101 – Introduction to Criminology CRIM101 – Introduction to Criminology CRIM135 – Introduction to Canadian Law and Legal Institutions: A Criminal Justice Perspective ECON103 – Principles of Microeconomics (Q) ECON105 – Principles of Macroeconomics (Q) ECON260 – Environmental Economics (Q) Prerequisite: ECON103 with C- grade ENGL101 – Introduction to Fiction (W) Prerequisite: Open to students who have passed 3 UTPII Classes ENGL105 – Intro to Issues in Literature & Culture (W) Prerequisite: Open to students who have passed 3 UTPII Classes FNST101- The Cultures, Languages and Origins of Canada’s First Peoples HIST102 – Canada Since Confederation HIST204 – The Social History of Canada Prerequisite: WL102; or HIST102; or ENGL101; or ENGL105 LING110 – The Wonder of Words LING200 – Introduction to the Description of English Grammar LING220 – Introduction to Linguistics PHIL001 – Critical Thinking (Q) POL100 – Introduction to Politics and Government POL231 – Comparative Politics Prerequisite: POL100 with D minimum grade POL241 – Introduction to International Politics Prerequisite: POL100 with D minimum grade PSYC109 – Brain, Mind & Society (W) Prerequisite: Open to students who have passed 3 UTPII Classes PSYC100 – Introduction to Psychology I PSYC102 – Introduction to Psychology II STAT203 – Introduction to Statistics for the Social Sciences (Q) WL102 – Literature Across Cultures (W) WL201 – East/West Prerequisite: WL102; or HIST102; or ENGL101; or ENGL105 ELECTIVE COURSES:

10

Choose up to three (3) courses from the following list: BISC100 – Introduction to Biology BUS251 – Financial Accounting (Q) Prerequisite: Open to students who have passed 3 UTPII Classes BUS272 – Behaviour in Organizations Prerequisite: Open to students who have passed 3 UTPII Classes CMNS110 – Introduction to Communication Studies CMNS130 – Communication and Social Change HSCI160 – Global Perspectives on Health BPK140 – Contemporary Health Issues MATH100 – Precalculus (Q) Prerequisite: MAP test score (9-19) OR MATH099 with B+ minimum grade OR MATH101 & 103 with C minimum grade MATH157 – Calculus for the Social Sciences I (Q) Prerequisite: MAP score (20 or above), MATH100 with C minimum grade, OR MATH101 & 103 with C minimum grade; Students with credit for MATH151 may not take MATH157 for further credit. * Students with IELTS 6.5 (minimum 6.5 in Reading and Writing bands, minimum 6.0 in Listening and Speaking bands) or equivalent are exempt from ALC099 - Academic Literacy Course. This determination is made at the time of admission if the student is eligible for exemption. Students who began their studies at FIC in the Cornerstone are exempt from ILS. Other courses taken at FIC but not offered in this program may count for credit. Please see an advisor.

11

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION COURSE SELECTIONS Students must complete all courses of their program with a grade of C- or better. Students must achieve and maintain a 2.40 cumulative grade point average (CGPA) by the end of their second semester of studies at FIC to remain qualified for continuance in the FIC/Beedie School of Business program. Failure to meet the continuance GPA will result in an automatic program change notification from FIC Advising.* To transfer into the Beedie School of Business, students must complete the requirements listed below, which include one ‘W’ and one ‘Q’ course; and achieve grade of C- or better in all courses. All (direct) students are required to take (and pass) ILS101 – Integrated Learning Skills and ALC099 – Academic Literacy Course in their first term of study unless exempted**.

REQUIRED COURSES: ECON103 – Principles of Microeconomics (Q) ECON105 – Principles of Macroeconomics (Q) ENGL101 – Intro to Fiction (W) OR ENGL105 – Intro to Issues in Literature & Culture (W) Prerequisite: Open to students who have passed 3 UTPII Classes MATH157 – Calculus for the Social Sciences I (Q) Prerequisite: MAP score (20 or above), MATH100 with C minimum grade, or MATH101 & 103 with C minimum grade; Students with credit for MATH151 may not take MATH157 for further credit. PHIL001 – Critical Thinking (Q) BUS272 – Behaviour in Organizations Prerequisite: Open to students who have passed 3 UTPII Classes BUS237 – Information Systems in Business BUS251 – Financial Accounting (Q) Prerequisite: Open to students who have passed 3 UTPII Classes with no grade less than a CELECTIVE COURSES: BISC100 – Introduction to Biology CMNS110 – Introduction to Communication Studies CMNS130 – Communication and Social Change CRIM101 – Introduction to Criminology CRIM135 – Introduction to Canadian Law and Legal Institutions: A Criminal Justice Perspective ECON260 – Environmental Economics (Q) Prerequisite: ECON103 with C- grade FNST101- The Cultures, Languages and Origins of Canada’s First Peoples HIST102 – Canada Since Confederation

12

HIST204 – The Social History of Canada Prerequisite: WL102; or HIST102; or ENGL101; or ENGL105 BPK140 – Contemporary Health Issues LING110 – The Wonder of Words LING200 – Introduction to the Description of English Grammar LING220 – Introduction to Linguistics MACM101 – Discrete Mathematics (Q) MATH100 – Precalculus (Q) For those students who do not meet the minimum requirements for MATH157. Prerequisite: MAP test score (9-19) OR MATH099 with B+ minimum grade OR MATH101 & 103 with C minimum grade POL100 – Introduction to Politics and Government POL231 – Comparative Politics Prerequisite: POL100 with D grade minimum POL241 – Introduction to International Politics Prerequisite: POL100 with D minimum grade PSYC109 – Brain, Mind & Society (W) Prerequisite: Open to students who have passed 3 UTPII Classes PSYC100 – Introduction to Psychology I PSYC102 – Introduction to Psychology II STAT203 – Introduction to Statistics for the Social Sciences WL102 – Literature Across Cultures (W) WL201 – East/West Prerequisite: WL102; or HIST102 & HIST204; or ENGL101; or ENGL105 *For readmission to the business pathway, students must take a minimum of three new courses including one new W and one new Q and achieve a semester GPA of 3.0 in the semester immediately following removal from the program. **Students with IELTS 6.5 (minimum 6.5 in Reading and Writing bands, minimum 6.0 in Listening and Speaking bands) or equivalent are exempt from ALC099 - Academic Literacy Course. This determination is made at the time of admission if the student is eligible for exemption. Students who began their studies at FIC in the Cornerstone program are exempt from ILS. ***If you began your program prior to Fall 2012 please see an advisor Note-Other courses taken at FIC but not offered in this program may count for credit. Please see an advisor.

Business Program Course Repeat Policy:

(effective for students transferring to SFU from

January 2015 onwards )

Students will only be allowed to repeat a maximum of 2 of the 8 required courses for admission. If you have attempted more than two repeats, your best two repeats will be used to calculate your Business admission average. A course may only be repeated one time for admission to SFU Business. ***Note this is different from the general FIC course repeat policy.

Recommended Course Selection Order for Business Administration Semester 1 Semester 2 Semester 3 ILS ENGL101/105 BUS237/PHIL001/Elective ALC (if required) MATH157/Elective BUS251 MATH100/157 PHIL001/BUS237 BUS272 ECON105 ECON103 PHIL001/Elective

13

COMMUNICATION, ARTS & TECHNOLOGY COURSE SELECTIONS To transfer into the Double Minor Program in the Faculty of Communications, Arts, and Technology, students must complete the requirements listed below, which include at least one ‘W’ and one ‘Q’ course; and a grade of C- or better in all courses. All (direct) students are required to take (and pass) ILS101 – Integrated Learning Skills and ALC099 – Academic Literacy Course in their first term of study unless exempted*. REQUIRED COURSES CMNS110 – Introduction to Communication Studies CMNS130 – Communication and Social Change FPA135** – Introduction to Cinema (effective Fall 2014) IAT102 – Graphic Design IAT110 – Visual Communication Design One of: ENGL101 – Introduction to Fiction (W) Prerequisite: Open to students who have passed 3 UTPII Classes ENGL105 – Intro to Issues in Literature & Culture (W) Prerequisite: Open to students who have passed 3 UTPII Classes PSYC109 – Brain, Mind & Society (W) Prerequisite: Open to students who have passed 3 UTPII Classes RECOMMENDED COURSE FPA149(formerly 184) – Sound (Q) ELECTIVE COURSES (At least one Q with a C- or better): BISC100 – Introduction to Biology BPK140 – Contemporary Health Issues BUS251 – Financial Accounting (Q) Prerequisite: Open to students who have passed 3 UTPII Classes BUS272 – Behaviour in Organizations Prerequisite: Open to students who have passed 3 UTPII Classes CMPT120 – Introduction to Computing Science & Programming I (Q) CMPT128 – Introduction to Computing Science & Programming for Engineers (Q) Prerequisite: CMPT120 with C- grade CRIM101 – Introduction to Criminology

14

CRIM135 – Introduction to Canadian Law and Legal Institutions: A Criminal Justice Perspective ECON103 – Principles of Microeconomics (Q) ECON105 – Principles of Macroeconomics (Q) ECON260 – Environmental Economics (Q) Prerequisite: ECON103 with C- grade FNST101- The Cultures, Languages and Origins of Canada’s First Peoples HIST102 – Canada Since Confederation HIST204 – The Social History of Canada Prerequisite: WL102; or HIST102; or ENGL101; or NGL105 HSCI160 – Global Perspectives on Health LING110 – The Wonder of Words LING200 - Introduction to the Description of English Grammar LING220- Introduction to Linguistics MACM101 – Discrete Mathematics (Q) MATH100 – Precalculus (Q) Prerequisite: MAP test score (9-19) OR MATH099 with B+ minimum grade OR MATH101 & 103 with C minimum grade MATH151 – Calculus I (Q) Prerequisite: MAP test score (27 or above), MATH100 with B minimum grade, OR MATH101 & 103 with B minimum grade; Students with credit for MATH157 may not take MATH151 for further credit. MATH152 – Calculus II (Q) Prerequisite: MATH151 with C- minimum grade OR MATH157 with B Minimum grade MATH157 – Calculus for the Social Sciences I (Q) Prerequisite: MAP score (20 or above), MATH100 with C minimum grade, OR MATH101 & 103 with C minimum grade; Students with credit for MATH151 may not take MATH157 for further credit. PHIL001 – Critical Thinking (Q) POL100 – Introduction to Politics and Government POL231 – Comparative Politics Prerequisite: POL100 with D minimum grade POL241 – Introduction to International Politics Prerequisite: POL100 with D minimum grade PSYC100 – Introduction to Psychology I PSYC102 – Introduction to Psychology II STAT203 – Introduction to Statistics for the Social Sciences (Q) WL102 – Literature Across Cultures (W) WL201 – East/West Prerequisite: WL102; or HIST102 & HIST204; or ENGL101; or ENGL105 * Students with IELTS 6.5 (minimum 6.5 in Reading and Writing bands, minimum 6.0 in Listening and Speaking bands) or equivalent are exempt from ALC099 - Academic Literacy Course. This determination is made at the time of admission if the student is eligible for exemption. Students who began their studies at FIC in the Cornerstone program are exempt from ILS. Other courses taken at FIC but not offered in this program may count for credit. Please see an advisor. **Students in the program prior to Fall 2014 can substitute FPA136 for FPA135 as long as they have a C- or better

• •

Students considering an IAT minor should try to take CMPT120, and a MATH Students considering a publishing minor should try to take ECON103/105

15

COMPUTING SCIENCE COURSE SELECTIONS To transfer into the Faculty of Applied Sciences, students must complete the requirements listed below, which include at least one ‘W’ and one ‘Q’ course; and a grade of C- or better in all courses. All (direct) students are required to take (and pass) ILS101 – Integrated Learning Skills and ALC099 – Academic Literacy Course in their first term of study unless exempted*. Please note CMPT130 and CMPT135 cannot be taken in the first semester of study.

REQUIRED COURSES: MACM101 – Discrete Mathematics I (Q) MATH151 – Calculus I (Q) Prerequisite: MAP test score (27 or above), MATH100 with B minimum grade, OR MATH101 & 103 with B minimum grade; Students with credit for MATH157 may not take MATH151 for further credit. MATH152 – Calculus II (Q) Prerequisite: MATH151 with C- minimum grade or MATH157 with B minimum grade CMPT130- Introduction to Computer Programming I (Q) ENGL101 – Intro to Fiction (W) OR ENGL105 – Intro to Issues in Literature & Culture (W) Prerequisite: Open to students who have passed 3 UTPII Classes CMPT135- Introduction to Computer Programming II (Q) Prerequisite: CMPT130 with a grade of CELECTIVE COURSES: BISC100 – Introduction to Biology CMNS110 – Introduction to Communication Studies CMNS130 – Communication and Social Change CRIM101 – Introduction to Criminology CRIM135 – Introduction to Canadian Law and Legal Institutions: A Criminal Justice Perspective ECON103 – Principles of Microeconomics (Q) ECON105 – Principles of Macroeconomics (Q) ECON260 – Environmental Economics (Q) Prerequisite: ECON103 with C- grade HIST102 – Canada Since Confederation HIST204 – The Social History of Canada Prerequisite: WL102; or HIST102 & HIST204; or ENGL101; or ENGL105 BPK140 – Contemporary Health Issues LING110 – The Wonder of Words LING200 – Introduction to the Description of English Grammar

16

LING220 – Introduction to Linguistics MATH232- Applied Linear Algebra (Q) Prerequisite: MATH151 with C- minimum grade or MATH157 with B or MACM101 with a minimum B minimum grade PHIL001 – Critical Thinking (Q) POL100 – Introduction to Politics and Government POL231 – Comparative Politics Prerequisite: POL100 with C- grade minimum POL241 – Introduction to International Politics Prerequisite: POL100 with C- minimum grade PSYC109 – Brain, Mind & Society (W) Prerequisite: Open to students who have passed 3 UTPII Classes PSYC100 – Introduction to Psychology I PSYC102 – Introduction to Psychology II WL102 – Literature Across Cultures (W) WL201 – East/West Prerequisite: WL102; or HIST102 & HIST204; or ENGL101; or ENGL105 * Students with IELTS 6.5 (minimum 6.5 in Reading and Writing bands, minimum 6.0 in Listening and Speaking bands) or equivalent are exempt from ALC099 - Academic Literacy Course. This determination is made at the time of admission if the student is eligible for exemption. Students who began their studies at FIC in the Cornerstone program are exempt from ILS. Other courses taken at FIC but not offered in this program may count for credit. Please see an advisor.

Recommended Course Selection Order for Computing Science Semester 1 Semester 2 Semester 3 ILS CMPT130 CMPT135 ALC (if required) MATH152 ENGL101/105 MACM101 Elective Elective MATH151 Elective Elective

Available substitutions for required courses: (for students prior to September 2015) • • •

CMPT130 can be replaced with CMPT120 CMPT135 can be replaced with CMPT128 Elective can be replaced with CMPT150

17

ENGINEERING SCIENCE COURSE SELECTIONS Students must complete all courses of their program with a grade of C- or better. Students must achieve and maintain a 2.00 cumulative grade point average (CGPA) by the end of their second semester of studies at FIC to remain qualified for continuance in the FIC/Applied Science-Engineering Science program. Failure to meet the continuance GPA will result in an automatic program change notification from FIC Advising.* To transfer into the Faculty of Applied Science, students must complete the requirements listed below, which include one ‘W’ and one ‘Q’ course; and achieve grade of C- or better in all courses. All (direct) students are required to take (and pass) ILS101 – Integrated Learning Skills and ALC099 – Academic Literacy Course in their first term of study unless exempted**. Students interested in pursuing an internal program transfer to any Engineering program must see an advisor by the end of week two of the semester prior to transferring to fill in the application.

REQUIRED COURSES: CMPT130 – Introduction to Computer Programming I (Q) CMPT135 – Intro to Computer Programming II (Q) Prerequisite: CMPT130 with C- grade ENSC105 – Process, Form, and Convention in Professional Genres (W) Corequisite: ENSC106 ENSC100 – Applied Science, Technology and Society Corequisite: ENSC105 MATH151 – Calculus I (Q) Prerequisite: MAP test score (27 or above), MATH100 with B minimum grade, OR MATH101 & 103 with B minimum grade MATH152 – Calculus II (Q) Prerequisite: MATH151 with C- minimum grade or MATH 157 with B minimum grade PHYS140 – Studio Physics – Mechanics and Modern Physics (Q) Corequisite: MATH151 PHYS141 – Studio Physics – Optics, Electricity and Magnetism(Q) Prerequisite: PHYS140 with C- minimum grade, MATH151. Corequisite: MATH152 ACCEPTED ELECTIVE COURSES: ARCH100- Ancient Peoples and Places BISC100 – Introduction to Biology CRIM101 – Introduction to Criminology ECON105 – Principles of Macroeconomics (Q) (recommended Biomed Eng)

18

ECON103 – Principles of Microeconomics (Q) (highly recommended Eng Phys, Systems, Electronics and Computer ENG) ENSC180- Introduction to Engineering Analysis (Q) Prerequisite: MATH151 with C- minimum grade. Corequisite: MATH152 and MATH232 GEOG100- Society, Space and Environment HIST102 – Canada Since Confederation MATH232- Applied Linear Algebra (Q) Prerequisite: MATH151 with C- minimum grade or MATH157 with B or MACM101 with a minimum B minimum grade POL100- Intro to Politics and Government PSYC100 – Introduction to Psychology I PSYC102 – Introduction to Psychology II *For readmission to the engineering pathway, students must take a minimum of three new courses including one new W and one new Q and achieve a semester GPA of 2.7 in the semester immediately following removal from the program. FIC does not guarantee Engineering approved courses during the readmission semester. **Students with IELTS 6.5 (minimum 6.5 in Reading and Writing bands, minimum 6.0 in Listening and Speaking bands) or equivalent are exempt from ALC099 - Academic Literacy Course. This determination is made at the time of admission if the student is eligible for exemption. Students who began their studies at FIC in the Cornerstone program are exempt from ILS. Other courses taken at FIC but not offered in this program may count for credit. Please see an advisor.

ENGINEERING SCIENCE COURSE SELECTIONS (Mechatronics) Students must complete all courses of their program with a grade of C- or better. Students must achieve and maintain a 2.00 cumulative grade point average (CGPA) by the end of their second semester of studies at FIC to remain qualified for continuance in the FIC/Applied Science-Engineering Science program. Failure to meet the continuance GPA will result in an automatic program change notification from FIC Advising.* To transfer into the Faculty of Applied Science, students must complete the requirements listed below, which include one ‘W’ and one ‘Q’ course; and achieve grade of C- or better in all courses. All (direct) students are required to take (and pass) ILS101 – Integrated Learning Skills and ALC099 – Academic Literacy Course in their first term of study unless exempted**.

REQUIRED COURSES: CMPT130 – Introduction to Computer Programming I (Q) CMPT135 – Intro to Computer Programming II (Q) Prerequisite: CMPT130 with C- grade ENSC105 – Process, Form, and Convention in Professional Genres (W) Corequisite: ENSC106 ENSC100 – Applied Science, Technology and Society Corequisite: ENSC105

19

MATH151 – Calculus I (Q) Prerequisite: MAP test score (27 or above), MATH100 with B minimum grade, OR MATH101 & 103 with B minimum grade MATH152 – Calculus II (Q) Prerequisite: MATH151 with C- minimum grade or MATH 157 with B minimum grade PHYS140 – Studio Physics – Mechanics and Modern Physics (Q) Corequisite: MATH151 PHYS141 – Studio Physics – Optics, Electricity and Magnetism(Q) Prerequisite: PHYS140 with C- minimum grade, MATH151. Corequisite: MATH152 CMNS110 – Introduction to Communication Studies ECON105 – Principles of Macroeconomics (Q) ACCEPTED ELECTIVE COURSES: BISC100 – Introduction to Biology ECON103 – Principles of Microeconomics (Q) ENSC180- Introduction to Engineering Analysis (Q) Prerequisite: MATH151 with C- minimum grade. Corequisite: MATH152 and MATH232 MATH232- Applied Linear Algebra (Q) Prerequisite: MATH151 with C- minimum grade or MATH157 with B or MACM101 with a minimum B minimum grade

*For readmission to the engineering pathway, students must take a minimum of three new courses including one new W and one new Q and achieve a semester GPA of 2.7 in the semester immediately following removal from the program. FIC does not guarantee Engineering approved courses during the readmission semester. **Students with IELTS 6.5 (minimum 6.5 in Reading and Writing bands, minimum 6.0 in Listening and Speaking bands) or equivalent are exempt from ALC099 - Academic Literacy Course. This determination is made at the time of admission if the student is eligible for exemption. Students who began their studies at FIC in the Cornerstone program are exempt from ILS. Other courses taken at FIC but not offered in this program may count for credit. Please see an advisor.

Available substitutions for required courses: (for students prior to September 2015) • •

CMPT130 can be replaced with CMPT120 CMPT135 can be replaced with CMPT128

*** Students who need to take MATH100 to qualify for engineering courses may use the course for credit towards degree completion but it does not count towards the ten courses at FIC for transfer. It will be calculated into your transfer GPA.

20

FACULTY OF ENVIRONMENT (BA) COURSE SELECTIONS To transfer into the Faculty of Environment, students must complete the requirements listed below, which include at least one ‘W’ and one ‘Q’ course; and a grade of C- or better in all courses. All (direct) students are required to take (and pass) ILS101 – Integrated Learning Skills and ALC099 – Academic Literacy Course in their first term of study unless exempted*. The Faculty of Environment has a number of degree options available. Please see an advisor for more information. REQUIRED COURSES: GEOG100 – Society, Space, Environment: Introducing Human Geography ARCH100 – Ancient People and Places One of: ENGL101 – Introduction to Fiction (W) Prerequisite: Open to students who have passed 3 UTPII Classes ENGL105 – Intro to Issues in Literature & Culture (W) Prerequisite: Open to students who have passed 3 UTPII Classes PSYC109 – Brain, Mind & Society (W) Prerequisite: Open to students who have passed 3 UTPII Classes Choose five (5) courses from the following list including one ‘Q’ course: BISC100 – Introduction to Biology BPK140 – Contemporary Health Issues CMPT120 – Introduction to Computing Science & Programming I (Q) CRIM101 – Introduction to Criminology CRIM135 – Introduction to Canadian Law and Legal Institutions: A Criminal Justice Perspective ECON103 – Principles of Microeconomics (Q) ECON105 – Principles of Macroeconomics (Q) ECON260 – Environmental Economics (Q) Prerequisite: ECON103 with C- grade HIST102 – Canada Since Confederation HIST204 – The Social History of Canada Prerequisite: WL102; or HIST102; or ENGL101; or ENGL105 HSCI160 – Global Perspectives on Health MACM101 – Discrete Mathematics (Q) MATH100 – Precalculus (Q) Prerequisite: MAP test score (9-19) OR MATH099 with B+ minimum grade OR MATH101 & 103 with C minimum grade

21

MATH151 – Calculus I (Q) Prerequisite: MAP test score (27 or above), MATH100 with B minimum grade, OR MATH101 & 103 with B minimum grade; Students with credit for MATH157 may not take MATH151 for further credit. MATH157 – Calculus for the Social Sciences I (Q) Prerequisite: MAP score (20 or above), MATH100 with C minimum grade, OR MATH101 & 103 with C minimum grade; Students with credit for MATH151 may not take MATH157 for further credit. POL100 – Introduction to Politics and Government POL231 – Comparative Politics Prerequisite: POL100 with D minimum grade POL241 – Introduction to International Politics Prerequisite: POL100 with D minimum grade PSYC100 – Introduction to Psychology I

ELECTIVE COURSES: Choose two (2) courses from the following list: CMNS110 – Introduction to Communication Studies CMNS130 – Communication and Social Change CMPT128 – Introduction to Computing Science & Programming for Engineers (Q) Prerequisite: CMPT120 with C- grade PSYC102 – Introduction to Psychology II STAT203 – Introduction to Statistics for the Social Sciences (Q) WL102 – Literature Across Cultures (W) WL201 – East/West Prerequisite: WL102; or HIST102 & HIST204; or ENGL101; or ENGL105 * Students with IELTS 6.5 (minimum 6.5 in Reading and Writing bands, minimum 6.0 in Listening and Speaking bands) or equivalent are exempt from ALC099 - Academic Literacy Course. This determination is made at the time of admission if the student is eligible for exemption. Students who began their studies at FIC in the Cornerstone program are exempt from ILS. Other courses taken at FIC but not offered in this program may count for credit. Please see an advisor.

22

FACULTY OF ENVIRONMENT (BSc) COURSE SELECTIONS To transfer into the Faculty of Environment, students must complete the requirements listed below, which include at least one ‘W’ and one ‘Q’ course; and a grade of C- or better in all courses. All (direct) students are required to take (and pass) ILS101 – Integrated Learning Skills and ALC099 – Academic Literacy Course in their first term of study unless exempted*. REQUIRED COURSES: GEOG100 – Society, Space, Environment: Introducing Human Geography ARCH100 – Ancient Peoople and Places (offered as of May 2014) CMPT120 – Introduction to Computing Science & Programming I (Q) MACM101 – Discrete Mathematics (Q) MATH151 – Calculus I (Q) Prerequisite: MAP test score (27 or above), MATH100 with B minimum grade, OR MATH101 & 103 with B minimum grade; Students with credit for MATH157 may not take MATH151 for further credit. MATH152 – Calculus II (Q) Prerequisite: MATH151 with C- minimum grade OR MATH157 with B Minimum grade One of: ENGL101 – Introduction to Fiction (W) Prerequisite: Open to students who have passed 3 UTPII Classes ENGL105 – Intro to Issues in Literature & Culture (W) Prerequisite: Open to students who have passed 3 UTPII Classes PSYC109 – Brain, Mind & Society (W) Prerequisite: Open to students who have passed 3 UTPII Classes Choose three (3) courses from the following list: BISC100 – Introduction to Biology BPK140 – Contemporary Health Issues CRIM101 – Introduction to Criminology CRIM135 – Introduction to Canadian Law and Legal Institutions: A Criminal Justice Perspective ECON103 – Principles of Microeconomics (Q) ECON105 – Principles of Macroeconomics (Q) ECON260 – Environmental Economics (Q) Prerequisite: ECON103 with C- grade HIST102 – Canada Since Confederation HIST204 – The Social History of Canada Prerequisite: WL102; or HIST102; or ENGL101; or ENGL105

23

HSCI160 – Global Perspectives on Health MATH100 – Precalculus (Q) Prerequisite: MAP test score (9-19) OR MATH099 with B+ minimum grade OR MATH101 & 103 with C minimum grade MATH157 – Calculus for the Social Sciences I (Q) Prerequisite: MAP score (20 or above), MATH100 with C minimum grade, OR MATH101 & 103 with C minimum grade; Students with credit for MATH151 may not take MATH157 for further credit. POL100 – Introduction to Politics and Government POL231 – Comparative Politics Prerequisite: POL100 with D minimum grade POL241 – Introduction to International Politics Prerequisite: POL100 with D minimum grade PSYC100 – Introduction to Psychology I

* Students with IELTS 6.5 (minimum 6.5 in Reading and Writing bands, minimum 6.0 in Listening and Speaking bands) or equivalent are exempt from ALC099 - Academic Literacy Course. This determination is made at the time of admission if the student is eligible for exemption. Students who began their studies at FIC in the Cornerstone program are exempt from ILS. Other courses taken at FIC but not offered in this program may count for credit. Please see an advisor.

24

HEALTH SCIENCES (BA) COURSE SELECTIONS To transfer into the Faculty of Health Sciences, students must complete the requirements listed below, which include at least one ‘W’ and one ‘Q’ course; and a grade of C- or better in all courses. All (direct) students are required to take (and pass) ILS101 – Integrated Learning Skills and ALC099 – Academic Literacy Course in their first term of study unless exempted*.

REQUIRED COURSES: PSYC109 – Brain, Mind & Society (W) Prerequisite: Open to students who have passed 3 UTPII Classes BPK140 – Contemporary Health Issues (Formerly KIN140) HSCI160 – Global Perspectives on Health BISC100 – Introduction to Biology STAT203 – Introduction to Statistics for the Social Sciences (Q) ELECTIVE COURSES: Choose 5 courses from the following list with no more than 2 from any one group. Any course taken towards this pathway must have a WQB designation: Group I: ECON103 – Principles of Microeconomics (Q) ECON105 – Principles of Macroeconomics (Q) ECON260 – Environmental Economics (Q) Prerequisite: ECON103 with C- grade MATH100 – Precalculus (Q) Prerequisite: MAP test score (9-19) OR MATH099 with B+ minimum grade OR MATH101 & 103 with C minimum grade MATH151 – Calculus I (Q) Prerequisite: MAP test score (27 or above), MATH100 with B minimum grade, OR MATH101 & 103 with B minimum grade; Students with credit for MATH157 may not take MATH151 for further credit. MATH152 – Calculus II (Q) Prerequisite: MATH151 with C- minimum grade OR MATH157 with B Minimum grade MATH157 – Calculus for the Social Sciences I (Q) Prerequisite: MAP score (20 or above), MATH100 with C minimum grade, OR MATH101 & 103 with C minimum grade; Students with credit for MATH151 may not take MATH157 for further credit.

25

Group II: ENGL101 – Introduction to Fiction (W) Prerequisite: Open to students who have passed 3 UTPII Classes ENGL105 – Intro to Issues in Literature & Culture (W) Prerequisite: Open to students who have passed 3 UTPII Classes FNST101- The Cultures, Languages and Origins of Canada’s First Peoples HIST102 – Canada Since Confederation HIST204 – The Social History of Canada prerequisite: HIST102 or WL102 with C- grade WL102 – Literature Across Cultures (W) WL201 – East/West Prerequisite: WL102; or HIST102 & HIST204; or ENGL101; or ENGL105 Group III: CMNS110 – Introduction to Communication Studies CRIM101 – Introduction to Criminology CRIM135 – Introduction to Canadian Law and Legal Institutions: A Criminal Justice Perspective LING110 – The Wonder of Words LING200 - Introduction to the Description of English Grammar LING220- Introduction to Linguistics POL100 – Introduction to Politics and Government POL231 – Comparative Politics Prerequisite: POL100 with D minimum grade POL241 – Introduction to International Politics Prerequisite: POL100 with D minimum grade PSYC100 – Introduction to Psychology I PSYC102 – Introduction to Psychology II * Students with IELTS 6.5 (minimum 6.5 in Reading and Writing bands, minimum 6.0 in Listening and Speaking bands) or equivalent are exempt from ALC099 - Academic Literacy Course. This determination is made at the time of admission if the student is eligible for exemption. Students who began their studies at FIC in the Cornerstone program are exempt from ILS. Other courses taken at FIC but not offered in this program may count for credit. Please see an advisor.

26

ASSOCIATE OF ARTS DEGREE COURSE SELECTIONS The Associate of Arts Degree is designed to provide an educational experience that prepares students for work, citizenship and an enriched life as an educated person, and to lay a solid foundation for further study. General Degree Requirements: • 6 units in first-year English; • 9 units in Science which shall include at least o 3 units in Mathematics, or Computing Science or Statistics; o 3 units in a laboratory science; • 36 units in Arts which shall include o 6 units in the Social Sciences; o 6 units in Humanities (other than English); • 24 additional units in Arts; and • 9 units in Arts, Science, or other areas = 60 units (total) Specific Degree Requirements: • Sixty (60) units as per degree structure • Minimum 18 (200-level) units • CGPA of 2.0 Pathway to the FIC Associate of Arts Degree: A. 6 units in first-year English ENGL101 – Introduction to Fiction (3 units) ENGL105 – Introduction to Issues in Literature & Culture (3 units) B. 9 units in Science BISC100 – Introduction to Biology (4 units) CMPT120 – Introduction to Computing Science & Programming I (3 units) CMPT128 – Introduction to Computing Science & Programming for Engineers (Q) CMPT150 – Introduction to Computer Design (3 units) HSCI160 – Global Perspectives on Health (3 units) BPK140 – Contemporary Health Issues (3 units) MACM101 – Discrete Mathematics (3 units) MATH100 – Precalculus (3 units) MATH151 – Calculus I (3 units) MATH152 – Calculus II (3 units) MATH157 – Calculus for the Social Sciences I (3 units) PHYS140 – Studio Physics – Mechanics and Modern Physics (Q) Corequisite: MATH151 STAT203 – Introduction to Statistics for the Social Sciences (3 units)

27

C. 36 units in Arts which shall include • 6 units in the Social Sciences CRIM101 – Introduction to Criminology (3 units) CRIM135 – Introduction to Canadian Law & Legal Institutions: A Criminal Justice Perspective (3 units) ECON103 – Principles of Microeconomics (4 units) ECON105 – Principles of Macroeconomics (4 units) ECON260 – Environmental Economics (3 units) LING110 – The Wonder of Words (3 units) LING200 – Introduction to the Description of English Grammar (3 units) LING220- Introduction to Linguistics (3 units) POL100 – Introduction to Politics & Government (3 units) POL231 – Comparative Politics (3 units) POL241 – Introduction to International Politics (3 units) PSYC109 – Brain, Mind & Society (3 units) PSYC100 – Introduction to Psychology I (3 units) PSYC102 – Introduction to Psychology II (3 units) STAT203 – Introduction to Statistics for the Social Sciences (3 units) • 6 units in Humanities HIST102 – Canada Since Confederation (3 units) HIST204 – The Social History of Canada (3 units) PHIL001 – Critical Thinking (3 units) WL102 – Literature Across Cultures (W) (3 units) WL201 – East/West (3 units) • 24 additional units in Arts Refer to Section C (above) for Social Sciences/Humanities courses D. 9 units in Arts, Science, or other areas BUS251 – Financial Accounting (3 units) BUS237- Information Systems in Business (3 units) BUS272 – Behaviour in Organizations (3 units) CMNS110 – Introduction to Communication Studies (3 units) CMNS130 – Communication and Social Change(3 units) IAT102 – Graphic Design (3 units) Refer to Sections B/C (above) for Arts/Science courses Other courses taken at FIC but not offered in this program may count for credit. Please see an advisor.

28

HONOUR ROLL A limited number of students will be admitted each term to the Honour Roll, on the basis of excellent work completed in the previous term. This award will be recorded in the student file and used for letters of reference. Admission to the honour roll requires that the student • •

must have completed a minimum of 12 academic units in the semester being evaluated must achieve a minimum semester grade point average (SGPA) of 3.70 calculated on all normally graded courses completed in the term being evaluated

Students will be automatically recognized if they achieve the criteria for Honour Roll status. Students will receive a certificate of their achievement and be invited to a celebratory reception the following semester.

PRINCIPAL’S HONOUR ROLL A limited number of students will be admitted each term to the Principal’s Honour Roll, mainly on the basis of excellent work completed in the previous year. This award will be recorded in the student file and used for letters of reference. Admission to the honour roll requires that the student • • •

must have completed a minimum of 30 units at Fraser International College by the end of the term being evaluated must have completed at least 9 units in the term being evaluated must achieve a minimum cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 4.00 calculated on all normally graded courses completed in the term being evaluated

Students will be automatically recognized if they achieve the criteria for Principal’s Honour Roll status. Students will receive a certificate of achievement and be invited to a celebratory reception the following semester.

29

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS CORNERSTONE PROGRAM: Title: Program: Description:

Title: Program: Description:

CNST101 Foundation English UTP Stage I / UTP Stage II The Cornerstone course will allow students the opportunity to develop skills and integrate more fully into their new study environment at FIC. Cornerstone is also streamlined into FIC current programs to ensure students learn the most essential skills for their academic success. Cornerstone students will develop skills in relationship to other course offerings at FIC.

CNQS101 Cornerstone Quantitative Survey UTP Stage I / UTP Stage II “Q” courses at FIC and SFU are courses that develop one’s quantitative skills. In our “Q” course, we will introduce the language, concepts and successful study techniques associated with six different introductory “Q” courses taught at FIC. The goal of this course is to set you up for success with the “Q” course (or courses) you decide to study.

INTEGRATED PROGRAM: The integrated program involves 8 hours per week, divided into 2 modules (Communications and Reading & Writing). Title: Program: Description:

INTG100 Academic English UTP Stage I / UTP Stage II Reading: In this module, you will learn skills to help you understand academic readings. These skills include distinguishing between main ideas and supporting details, and facts and opinions. You will learn to analyze the purpose of a writer’s argument and the way the argument is constructed. As you read, you will also expand your development of academic vocabulary. Writing: The purpose of the writing component is to prepare you to meet the writing demands of your courses at FIC. You will be guided through the process of planning and writing of the paragraph and essay, focusing on persuasive writing. You will also receive instruction in how to revise and edit your writing. Communications: This module assists students in building the necessary communication skills required to participate and succeed in an academic environment. Students will be shown how to develop their confidence in speaking in groups and as individuals with a strong emphasis on understanding purpose and audience in speaking. Additionally, students will build active listening skills through the use of listening strategies learned throughout the course. They will be able to speak more effectively and listen with a higher degree of accuracy as they practice speaking on and listening to academically focused topics.

30

UTP STAGE I: Title: Program:

BUS108 - Introduction to Management UTP Stage I

Description: Theories, concepts and issues in the field of organizational behaviour with an emphasis on team processes. Core topics include employee motivation and performance; stress management; communication; work perceptions and attitudes; decision-making; team dynamics; employee involvement and conflict management. Prerequisite: FIC direct entry equivalent. Title:

Program: Description:

Title:

Program: Description:

COM001 - Introduction to Computing Concepts & Algorithms UTP Stage I COM001 introduces students to fundamentals of computing and algorithmic thinking. This course is not about computer usage – it is about computing science. It emphasizes understanding and problem-solving skills related to basic concepts of information and computation. At times, a broader, historical context is provided to illustrate the development of human thought and ideas. Students will acquire a good sense of what computing science is about, its intrinsic challenges, and its possible future. The course gives foundation both to those who will study computing science, as well as to those who will work with computing science in any capacity – as users, collaborators, or managers. This course complements COM002.

COM002 - Introduction to Computers and Their Applications UTP Stage I COM002 introduces students to computers and their usage in a variety of software applications. It is a lab course, where the primary focus is on developing hands-on computer skills. In addition, theoretical background information is presented as needed. Microsoft Office 2010 will be used for office-type applications to develop specific skills, although the skills acquired go beyond particular software. Topics of the course include computer components, operating systems, networking, security; word processing; spreadsheets; database systems; presentation graphics. In COM002, students will acquire knowledge, skills, and confidence to use computers and their software capabilities in their future studies, work, business endeavours, and every-day life.

31

Title: Program:

ECN100 - Introduction to Economics UTP Stage I

Description: Economics is a social science that includes the study of how consumers, households and firms – make decisions. Macroeconomics encompasses the aggregate economy and is concerned with issues such as total output, interest rates, inflation and unemployment. This course will attempt to combine economic theory with practical, everyday applications. The goal of this course is to give students a sufficient understanding of economic issues and problems so that students may understand the impact of government policy, economic phenomena, and the choices people make. Title: Program:

ESR100 - English Skills / Reading UTP Stage I

Description: Offers university bound students the opportunity to develop a full range of active reading skills and acquire a broader knowledge base and vocabulary through reading and analysing scholarly material from a variety of disciplines. Included in the course are weekly speed reading practices and vocabulary expansion activities, strategies for textbook reading, a detailed study of text patterns, and an introduction to library skills to be applied in finding appropriate scholarly support for a given thesis. This course complements IUW100. Prerequisite: FIC direct entry equivalent.

Title: Program:

IUW100 - Introduction to University Writing UTP Stage I

Description: This course focuses on the skills necessary to produce an essay at an academic level. The focus of study ranges from sentence structure and paragraph development to planning and composing essays. The course also covers Modern Language Association (MLA) documentation. This course complements ESR100. Prerequisite: FIC direct entry equivalent. Title: Program:

MTH099 - Beginning with Algebra UTP Stage I

Description: An introductory course providing students with a chance to build a stronger foundation in the key concepts necessary for success in precalculus courses. Content includes Exponents, Radicals, Rational Expressions, Factoring, Equations Solving, Analytic Geometry, Systems of Equations, Plane Geometry and Basic Trigonometry. This course is designed for students who do not meet the minimum requirements for MTH101 / MTH103 or MATH100.

32

Title: Program:

MTH101 - Introduction to Mathematics UTP Stage I

Description: An introductory course providing students with a chance to master key concepts in precalculus mathematics (grade 12 math) and its applications, and to introduce students to calculus in a highly supportive atmosphere in order to prepare them to succeed in first year math calculus and science courses. Content includes Review of Algebra, Graphs and Inequalities, Functions, Analytical Geometry, Sequences and Series, Systems of Equations and Inequalities, Linear Functions, Quadratic Functions, Maximum and Minimum problems. This course complements MTH103. Title: Program:

MTH103 - Foundations of Mathematics UTP Stage I

Description: An introductory course providing students with a chance to master key concepts in precalculus mathematics (grade 12 math) and its applications, and to introduce students to calculus in a highly supportive atmosphere in order to prepare them to succeed in first year math calculus and science courses. Content includes Review of Algebra, Graphs and Inequalities, Functions, Analytical Geometry, Sequences and Series, Systems of Equations and Inequalities, Linear Functions, Quadratic Functions, Maximum and Minimum problems. This course complements MTH101. Title:

Program:

PHL120 - An Introduction to Philosophical Reasoning UTP Stage I

Description: This course is an introduction philosophical reasoning and explores the basics of rational argumentation, truth and logic, including understanding someone else’s argument, judging whether the argument has a proper logical structure or not, and forming a positive or negative overall appraisal of an argument. This course also examines several diverse philosophical topics, including ethical issues such as international aid (how much charity should rich people give to poor people?), issues about the nature of reality (are ghosts and spirits real?) and issues about what we can know (could you know if you were really inside The Matrix right now?). This course does not presuppose any previous training in formal logic. Prerequisite: FIC direct entry equivalent. Title: Program:

UNI101 – Introduction to University Life UTP Stage I

Description: In UNI101 you will learn the technical and practical skills required to be successful in a wide range of university courses. We will emphasize social connections, health, studying and overall academic skills. Topics to be covered include physical and mental wellness, connecting to the university, presentations and writing, research, academic honesty and career preparation.

33

Title: Program:

WIS100 – World Issues UTP Stage I

Description: World Issues is an ideal course for all students interested in the social, economic, political, and environmental issues that face our world. Topics studied may include global economy, the environment, and human rights, and will be addressed through reflective papers, projects, and presentations.

UTP STAGE II/Associate of Arts Degree: Title: Program:

ALC099- Academic Literacy Course UTP II

Description: This course is intended to prepare you for the rigor and requirements of academic writing regardless of your intended program of study. This course will make you aware of and competent in all components of written discourse, including brainstorming, outlining, researching, drafting, revising, and preparing citations. You will learn to read closely and use data to support your own independent theses and express opinions with confidence. There will be focus on plagiarism and other forms of academic misconduct and how to avoid these serious mistakes. You will also be expected to be highly engaged and prepared to interact in group discussions and peer-review as well as work independently to complete larger assignments outside of class time. Title: Program: Faculty: Description:

Title:

ARCH100-3 Ancient People and Places Arts and Social Sciences Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences A broad survey of human cultural development from the late Palaeolithic/Palaeo Indian periods (ca 40,000 BP) to the rise of civilization and empires, in both the Old and New Worlds. Breadth-Social Sciences.

BISC100-4 Introduction to Biology

Program:

Biological Sciences

Faculty:

Faculty of Science

Description:

An introduction to the basic concepts of biology, emphasizing evolution as a unifying theme. Topics include cell structure, mitosis and meiosis, DNA structure and function, evolution and population and ecosystem ecology. There is a $100 Lab fee associated with this course. Breadth-Science.

34

Title: Program: Faculty: Description:

BPK140-3 Contemporary Health Issues Kinesiology Applied Sciences Explores health from a holistic perspective, in which health is viewed as physical, psychological, and social well-being. Considers genetics, environment, personal health behaviors (such as diet, exercise, stress management, and drug use), socioeconomic status, health care delivery systems, and aging with the intent to improve students' abilities to evaluate health information. Breadth-Science. (Not available to students on AP)

Prerequisite: FIC direct entry equivalent.

Title:

BUS251-3 Financial Accounting I

Program:

Business Administration

Faculty:

Business Administration

Description: An introduction to financial accounting, including accounting terminology, understanding financial statements, and analysis of a business entity using financial statements. Includes also time value of money and a critical review of the conventional accounting system. Quantitative. (Not available to students on AP) Title:

BUS237-3 Information Systems in Business

Program:

Business Administration

Faculty:

Business Administration

Description: Introduces students to the knowledge and skills necessary to make full use of business information systems. Demonstrates how information systems are used by organizations to improve productivity and create competitive advantage. Provides hands on training in productivity tools including Excel, Visio, Access and Web design tools. (Not available to students on AP)

BUS272-3 Behavior in Organizations Program:

Business Administration

Faculty:

Business Administration

Description: Theories, concepts and issues in the field of organizational behaviour with an emphasis on individual and team processes. Core topics include employee motivation and performance, stress management, communication, work perceptions and attitudes, decision-making, team dynamics, employee involvement and conflict management. Prerequisite: Open to students who have passed 3 UTPII classes.

35

Title:

Program: Faculty: Description:

Title: Program: Faculty: Description:

Title:

CMNS110-3 Introduction to Communication Studies Communication Communication, Art & Technology An introduction to selected theories about human communication. This course is required for a major, honors or minor in communication. BreadthSocial Sciences.

CMNS130-3 Communication and Social Change Communication Communication, Art & Technology An introduction to the role of mass communication (radio, television, telecommunications and the press) in Canadian society. This course is required for a major, honors or minor in communication.

CMPT120-3 Introduction to Computing Science and Programming I

Program:

Computing Science

Faculty:

Applied Sciences

Description:

Title:

An elementary introduction to computing science and computer programming, suitable for students with little or no programming background. Students will learn fundamental concepts and terminology of computing science, acquire elementary skills for programming in a highlevel language and be exposed to diverse fields within, and applications of computing science. Topics include pseudocode; data types and control structures; fundamental algorithms; computability and complexity; computer architecture; and history of computing science. Treatment is informal and programming is presented as a problem-solving tool. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

CMPT130-3 Introduction to Computer Programming I

Program:

Computing Science

Faculty:

Applied Sciences

Description:

Recommended:

An introduction to computing science and computer programming, using a systems oriented language, such as C or C++. This course introduces basic computing science concepts. Topics will include: elementary data types, control structures, functions, arrays and strings, fundamental algorithms, computer organization and memory management. Students with credit for CMPT 102, 120, 126, or 128 may not take this course for further credit. Prerequisite: BC Math 12 (or equivalent, or any of MATH 100, 150, 151, 154, or 157). Quantitative/Breadth-Science. BC Math 12 or equivalent.

36

Title:

Program: Faculty: Description:

Prerequisite: Title:

Program: Faculty: Description:

Prerequisite: Title: Program: Faculty: Description:

CMPT135 – Introduction to Computer Programming II(Q) Computing Science Applied Sciences A second course in systems-oriented programming and computing science that builds upon the foundation set in CMPT 130 using a systems-oriented language such as C or C++. Topics: a review of the basic elements of programming; introduction to object-oriented programming (OOP); techniques for designing and testing programs; use and implementation of elementary data structures and algorithms; introduction to embedded systems programming. Students with credit for CMPT 125, 126, or 128 may not take this course for further credit. Prerequisite: CMPT 130. Quantitative. CMPT130 with C- grade.

CMPT128 – Introduction to Computing Science & Programming for Engineers (Q) Computing Science Applied Sciences "An introduction to computing science and computer programming, suitable for students wishing to major in Engineering Science, Computing Science or a related program. This course introduces basic computing science concepts, and fundamentals of object oriented programming. Topics include: fundamental algorithms and problem solving; abstract data types and elementary data structures; basic object-oriented programming and software design; elements of empirical and theoretical algorithmics; computation and computability; specification and program correctness." Quantitative. CMPT120 with C- grade.

CMPT150-3 Introduction to Computer Design Computing Science Applied Sciences Digital design concepts are presented in such a way that students will learn how basic logic blocks of a simple computer are designed. Topics covered include basic Von Neumann computer architecture; an introduction to assembly language programming; combinational logic design; and sequential logic design. Quantitative.

Recommended This course is not available to students effective fall 2015. .

37 Title: Program: Faculty:

CRIM101-3 Introduction to Criminology Criminology Arts and Social Sciences

Description:

This course provides a basic understanding of criminological concepts and theories and a solid foundation for future criminology courses. Emphasis will be placed on developing the relationship between criminological ideas, research, practice and policy in Canada. Lectures and readings will introduce students to a range of theoretical and substantive issues in criminology. Topics will include: examination of different terms and concepts commonly used in Criminology, such as crime, delinquency, deviance, criminal, victim, rehabilitation and treatment; criminology as a body of knowledge and as a profession; position and subject matter of criminology; relationship between criminology and other academic disciplines; specificity of criminology; relationship between theory and practice; history and evolution of criminological thought; elements of continuity and discontinuity between classical and modern theories of criminality; levels of explanations in criminology; practical applications of criminology, and the foundations of a modern criminal policy. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Prerequisite:

FIC direct entry equivalent.

Title:

Program: Faculty:

CRIM135-3 Introduction to Canadian Law and Legal Institutions: A Criminal Justice Perspective Criminology Arts and Social Sciences

Description:

A general introduction to the fundamental and competing principles of jurisprudence and to the basic legal institutions of Canada. Prepares students for those law and law related courses offered within the School of Criminology and will consider the history of Canadian law, the development of the Canadian constitution, the system of Canadian courts and the roles and responsibilities of members of the legal profession. In addition, the course will consider the nature of legal reasoning, the doctrine of precedent, principles of statutory interpretation and will also introduce the fields of contract, torts, administrative law, and family law. Also examines the process of law reform in Canada. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Prerequisite:

FIC direct entry equivalent; CRIM101 recommended.

Title: Program: Faculty: Description:

ECON103-4 Principles of Microeconomics Economics Arts and Social Sciences The principal elements of theory concerning utility and value; price and costs; factor analysis; productivity; labor organization; competition and monopoly; and the theory of the firm. Quantitative/Breadth-Social Sciences.

38

Title: Program: Faculty:

ECON260-3 Environmental Economics Economics Arts and Social Sciences

Description:

Economic analysis of environmental problems (water and air pollution, etc.) Evaluation of market failures due to externalities and public goods. Market and non-market regulation of environmental problems. Quantitative.

Prerequisite:

ECON103 with C- grade.

Title: Program: Faculty: Description:

Title: Program: Faculty:

ECON105-4 Principles of Macroeconomics Economics Arts and Social Sciences The principal elements of theory concerning money and income; distribution; social accounts; public finance; international trade; comparative systems; and development and growth. Quantitative/Breadth-Social Sciences.

ENGL101W-3 Introduction to Fiction English Arts and Social Sciences

Description:

Examines selected works of literature in order to develop a critical awareness of literary techniques and contexts in the representation of experience. May include the comparative study of works in related literary and artistic genres, and will pay some attention to literature of the 20th century. Includes attention to writing skills. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

Prerequisite

Open to students who have passed 3 UTPII courses.

Title:

Program: Faculty:

ENGL105W-3 Intro to Issues in Literature & Culture English Arts and Social Sciences

Description:

An introduction to the study of literature within the wider cultural field, with a focus on contemporary issues across genres and media. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

Prerequisite

Open to students who have passed 3 UTPII courses.

Title:

Program: Faculty: Description:

ENSC105W-3 Process, Form, and Convention in Professional Genres Engineering Science Applied Science The course teaches fundamentals of informative and persuasive communication for professional engineers and computer scientists in

39

order to assist students in thinking critically about various contemporary technical, social, and ethical issues. It focuses on communicating technical information clearly and concisely, managing issues of persuasion when communicating with diverse audiences, presentation skills, and teamwork. Corequisite: ENSC 106. Prerequisite Title:

Program: Faculty:

Open to students have passed 3 UTPII courses.

ENSC100-3 Applied Science, Technology and Society Engineering Science Applied Science

Description:

Reviews the different modes of thought characteristic of science, engineering and computing. Examines the histories and chief current research issues in these fields. Considers the ethical and social responsibilities of engineering and computing work. Corequisite: ENSC 105W.

Prerequisite

Open to students who passed 3 UTPII courses.

Title:

Program: Faculty:

ENSC180-3 Introduction to Engineering Analysis Engineering Science Applied Science

Description:

Introduction to MATLAB and its use in engineering. Implementation, verification, and analysis of various engineering algorithms used in signal and image processing, robotics, communications engineering.

Prerequisite

MATH 151 with a grade of C-. Corequisite: MATH 152 and MATH 232.

Title:

FNST101-3 The Cultures, Languages and Origins of Canada’s First Peoples

Program:

Arts and Social Sciences

Faculty:

Arts and Social Sciences

Description:

An introduction to the nature and goals of First Nations studies as an academic discipline; survey of prehistory, traditional cultures and aboriginal languages of Canada's First Nations. Breadth-Humanities/Social Sciences.

40

Title: Program: Faculty: Description:

Title: Program: Faculty: Description:

Title:

Program: Faculty: Description:

Title: Program: Faculty:

FPA135-3 Introduction to Cinema Contemporary Arts Communications, Arts and Technology An introductory course designed to facilitate a fundamental understanding of film technique, style and form in order to develop the skills with which to analyze films of all genres. Through lectures and screenings it will provide an overview of the social, aesthetic and technical development of motion pictures, introducing tools for the formal analysis of the elements of cinema: cinematography and lighting, art direction, performance, editing, sound and the screenplay. The formal and historical elements of documentary, avant-garde and dramatic films will be addressed. The course will involve the screening and discussion of several complete feature films and shorts, as well as excerpts from others.

FPA149-3 Sound Contemporary Arts Communications, Arts and Technology Introduction to acoustics, psychoacoustics, sound synthesis, audio sampling and signal processing, and sound production in general as relating to music, film sound, radio, new media, art installations and live performance. Quantitative.

GEOG100-3 Society, Space, Environment: Introducing Human Geography Geography Environment A survey of how humans shape their world, considered from spatial and environmental perspectives. Themes include population, culture, resources, livelihood, and cities. Breadth-Social Sciences.

HIST102-3 Canada since Confederation History Arts and Social Sciences

Description:

A survey of Canadian history since 1867. Breadth-Humanities.

Prerequisite:

FIC direct entry equivalent.

41

Title: Program: Faculty:

HIST204-3 The Social History of Canada History Arts and Social Sciences

Description:

A survey of major themes in Canadian social history from the arrival of Europeans to the present day. Particular attention will be paid to the effects of gender, race and class on the experience to Canadians over time. Breadth-Humanities.

Prerequisite:

WL102; or HIST102 or ENGL101; or ENGL105

Title:

HSCI160-3 Global Perspectives on Health

Program:

Health Sciences

Faculty:

Health Sciences

Description:

Title: Program: Faculty: Description:

The primary aim of the course is to engage and inspire students about the opportunities and challenges in global health. This is an overview of issues in global health from many different viewpoints and provides general understanding of factors/dynamics that affect the health of human populations and efforts to improve it. What is the difference between the health of an individual and the health of a population, vulnerable populations, and global population? What’s the burden of disease and who shoulders the greatest proportion of it? What are the determinants of health, what’s the role of culture, lifestyle, health beliefs, environmental factors, access to health services and other resources? The course will answer these and many other questions from the global perspective; it will also look at the changing pattern of population health and diseases in the world and will discuss major challenges and emerging issues. Breadth-Social Sciences.

IAT102-3 Graphic Design Interactive Arts and Technology Communication, Art and Technology Introduction to fundamental design principles for visual communication. Organized as a continual interplay of theory and practice, students will examine historical, philosophical, perceptual and semiotic approaches to understanding graphic design, and will explore principles of form, such as structure and composition, hierarchy, form, color, space, scale, typography, and legibility and readability through hands-on projects. Traditional time-based and interactive media forms will be compared and contrasted.

42

Title: Program: Faculty: Description:

Title: Program: Faculty: Description:

Title:

Program: Faculty: Description:

Title: Program: Faculty: Description:

IAT110-3 Graphic Design Interactive Arts and Technology Communication, Art and Technology Visual communication for art and design in digital media. Students learn the fundamentals of digital raster and vector image creation. Design principles such as form, typography and colour theory as they apply to digital media will be taught. Students will have core projects in digital photography, magazine layout and kinetic typography. Primarily for nonSIAT majors; while SIAT majors may take the course, it does not count for credit for SIAT degree requirements.

LING110-3 The Wonder of Words Linguistics Arts and Social Sciences Study of the structure of words, the change of meaning of words, the change in form of words. Examples from English, French and other languages. A general interest course open to all students. Breadth- Social Science.

LING200-3 Introduction to the Description of English Grammar Linguistics Arts and Social Sciences A practical overview of English grammar based on linguistic principles, for those designing basic knowledge of language structure, grammatical categories and grammatical analysis. This course is particularly suited for students interested in the teaching of English as a second language. Breadth-Social Science

LING220-3 Introduction to Linguistics Linguistics Arts and Social Sciences This class is an introductory study of how language works and the complexities of human language. The course focuses on the central topics of modern linguistic science: Phonetics - the production, transmission, and perception of speech sounds, Phonology - the patterning of speech sounds, Morphology - word structure, Syntax sentence structure, and Semantics - meaning. Breadth-Social Science.

43

Title: Program: Faculty: Description:

Title: Program: Faculty: Description:

Prerequisite:

Title: Program: Faculty: Description:

Prerequisite:

MACM101-3 Discrete Mathematics I Mathematics and Computing Science Science This course is an introduction to discrete mathematics. The course will focus on establishing basic principles and motivate the relevance of those principles by providing examples of applications in computing science. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

MATH100-3 Precalculus Mathematics Science Designed to prepare students for first year Calculus courses. Topics include language and notation of mathematics; problem solving; algebraic, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions and their graphs. MATH 100 may not be counted towards the mathematics minor, major or honors degree requirements. Students with a passing grade in MATH157 or MATH151 may not take this course for credit. Quantitative. MAP test score (9-19) OR MATH099 with B+ minimum grade OR MATH101 & 103 with C minimum grade.

MATH151-3 Calculus I Mathematics Science Designed for students specializing in mathematics, physics, chemistry, computing science and engineering. Logarithmic and exponential functions; trigonometric functions; and inverse functions. Limits, continuity, and derivatives. Techniques of differentiation, including logarithmic and implicit differentiation. The Mean Value Theorem. Applications of Differentiation including extrema, curve sketching, related rates, Newton's method. Antiderivatives and applications. Conic sections, polar coordinates, parametric curves. Quantitative. MAP test score (27 or above), MATH100 with B minimum grade, OR MATH101 & 103 with B minimum grade. Students with credit for MATH157 may not take MATH151 for further credit.

44

Title: Program: Faculty:

MATH157-3 Calculus for the Social Sciences I Mathematics Science

Description:

Designed for students specializing in business or the social sciences. Topics include limits, growth rate and the derivative; logarithmic exponential and trigonometric functions and their application to business, economics, optimization and approximation methods; functions of several variables. Quantitative.

Prerequisite:

MAP Score (20 or above), MATH100 with C grade minimum, OR MATH101 & 103 with C grade minimum. Students with credit for MATH151 may not take MATH157 for further credit.

Title: Program: Faculty:

MATH152-3 Calculus II Mathematics Science

Description:

Riemann sum, Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, definite, indefinite and improper integrals, approximate integration, integration techniques, applications of integration. First-order separable differential equations. Sequences and series, series tests, power series, convergence and applications of power series.

Prerequisite:

MATH151 with a minimum C- grade or MATH157 with a minimum B grade.

Title: Program: Faculty:

MATH232-3 Applied Linear Algebra Mathematics Science

Description:

Linear equations, matrices, determinants. Introduction to vector spaces and linear transformations and bases. Complex numbers. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors; diagonalization. Inner products and orthogonality; least squares problems. An emphasis on applications involving matrix and vector calculations. Students with credit for MATH 240 make not take this course for further credit.

Prerequisite:

MATH151 with a minimum C- grade or MATH157 or MACM101 with a minimum B grade.

Title: Program: Faculty:

PHIL001-Critical Thinking Philosophy Arts and Social Sciences

Description:

An introduction to the evaluation of arguments as they are encountered in everyday life. The central aim will be to sharpen skills of reasoning and argumentation by understanding how arguments work and learning to distinguish those which actually prove what they set out to show from those which do not. Quantitative.

Prerequisite:

FIC direct entry equivalent.

45

Title:

Program: Faculty:

PHYS140-4 Studio Physics – Mechanics and Modern Physics Engineering Science Science

Description:

A general calculus-based introduction to mechanics taught in an integrated lecture-laboratory environment. Topics include translational and rotational motion, momentum, energy, gravitation, and selected topics in modern physics. Prerequisite: BC Principles of Physics 12, or equivalent. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

Prerequisite

MATH151 must precede or be taken concurrently.

Title:

Program: Faculty:

PHYS141-4 Studio Physics – Optics, Electricity and Magnetism Engineering Science Science

Description:

A general calculus-based introduction to electricity, magnetism and optics taught in an integrated lecture-laboratory environment. Topics include electricity, magnetism, simple circuits, optics and topics from applied physics. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

Prerequisite

PHYS140 with C-minimum grade and MATH152 must precede or be taken concurrently.

Title:

Program: Faculty:

POL100-3 Introduction to Politics and Government Political Science Arts and Social Sciences

Description:

A comprehensive introduction to the study of politics and government for both political science majors and students specializing in other disciplines. The course will explore the major concepts, methods, approaches and issues in political science, as well as the primary components of government structure and the political process. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Prerequisite:

FIC direct entry equivalent.

Title: Program: Faculty:

POL231-3 Comparative Politics Political Science Arts and Social Sciences

Description:

An introduction to political processes and structures in comparative perspective. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Prerequisite:

POL100 with D minimum grade.

46

Title: Program: Faculty:

POL241-3 Introduction to International Politics Political Science Arts and Social Sciences

Description:

Theory and practice of international politics, diplomacy, hot war, cold war, alliances and the role of leaders. Prerequisite: POL 100 or 101W or permission of department. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Prerequisite:

POL100 with D minimum grade.

Title: Program: Faculty:

PSYC109W-3 Brain, Mind and Society Psychology Arts and Social Sciences

Description:

Introduces the student to issues in Psychology by surveying the research on brain and behaviour and the implications of this work for individuals and society. Beginning with neurons, this course explores the transition to human experience. Writing/Breadth-Science.

Prerequisite:

Open to students who have passed 3 UTPII classes.

Title: Program: Faculty: Description:

Title: Program: Faculty: Description:

PSYC100-3 Introduction to Psychology I Psychology Arts and Social Sciences Acquaints the student with the major issues in contemporary psychology and considers the historical antecedents. Special attention is given to questions of methodology and research design in psychology. Topics in physiological psychology, perception, learning and motivation are considered. Breadth-Social Sciences.

PSYC102-3 Introduction to Psychology II Psychology Arts and Social Sciences Acquaints the student with major issues in contemporary psychology and considers their historical antecedents. Topics in learning, cognition, social psychology and abnormal psychology are considered. PSYC100 is strongly recommended. Breadth-Social Sciences.

47

Title:

Program: Faculty: Description:

Title: Program: Faculty: Description:

Title: Program: Faculty:

STAT203-3 Introduction to Statistics for the Social Sciences Statistics Science / Arts & Social Sciences Introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics aimed at students in the social sciences. Scales of measurement. Descriptive statistics. Measures of association. Hypothesis tests and confidence intervals. Intended to be particularly accessible to students who are not specializing in Statistics. Quantitative.

WL102W-3 Literature Across Cultures World Literature Arts and Social Sciences In this course, we will consider the use of contemporary literary forms and genres in a survey of World Literature. Specifically, we will focus on narratives that feature Sub-worlds and Other worlds. These narrative settings offer an interesting perspective on World Literature because they stretch and skew the boundaries of traditional narrative locations. We will begin with a discussion of the literary canon and basic elements of fiction. Then we will venture into the genre of drama and a study of social issues, identity, the self and the other. Our discussion will move on to include texts from a wide variety of cultures and authors (from Asia, Africa and Europe, to the Americas). We will look at diverse literary ways of “othering”: the double, the absurd, and sub-worlds. Breadth-Humanities and W- Writing.

WL201-3 East/ West World Literature Arts and Social Sciences

Description:

Explores the relationship between Eastern and Western narratives. The focus may include the mutual influence of Eastern and Western cultural traditions and modernities, the construction of the ‘East’ in the West and of the ‘West’ in the East, theories of Orientalism and Occidentalism, and forms of East/West syncretism. Breadth-Humanities

Prerequisite:

WL102; or HIST102 & 204; or ENGL101; or ENGL105.

48

ENROLMENT STEPS STEP 1: SET UP YOUR STUDENT PORTAL The Student Portal is where you find all your information about classes and student life at FIC. You will need to access this website with a password and FIC Student ID. What you need: □ Yourself □ Your FIC Letter of Offer (if you have it) □ Your Passport □ Your Study Permit □ Your Address Details

Getting Setup on FIC’s Portal: • Go to FIC’s Portal: http://learning.fraseric.ca • Login with your details Username: Your FIC ID (e.g. ABCDD72) Password: Your Date of Birth (YYYYMMDD) • Complete the Information Screens Step 3: Selecting your Courses • Once in the Portal, Choose “Enrolment” from the top menu • Click “Accept” if you agree to the terms • Click on the courses in the timetable that you wish to study this semester. You should choose courses that are part of your program. If you have problems selecting courses, or cannot see courses that match your program, please email [email protected]. • Once you have finalized your subject selection, Click “Enrol”

If you see an enrolment confirmation, you are now enrolled in those courses at FIC

49

STEP 2: PICK UP YOUR STUDENT ID CARD Your Student ID card is your main source of identification at FIC and SFU. It will also allow you access to lots of resources at FIC and SFU. What you need: □ Yourself □ Your Passport □ Your SFU ID number How to get your ID Card: • Go to Maggie Benson Centre (MBC) Student Service’s Office. • Bring your SFU ID number and passport with you. Your SFU ID number can be found on your Student Portal Profile under “UNI ID.” • The SFU officers will help you create your ID at the office.

50

STEP 3: GET READY TO USE COMPUTERS AT FIC

You need an ID to access computers at FIC and SFU. This ID is called your SFU Computing ID. With these instructions, you can create your SFU Computing ID and SFU Email Account What you need: □ Yourself □ Your SFU ID Number □ Your Date of Birth

Creating your SFU Computing ID: • Go to SFU’s website: http://my.sfu.ca • Click on “Activate your SFU Computing ID” • Click “Account Activation” • Click “I Accept” • Enter your SFU ID and your Date of Birth then click Submit • Complete the questions (so you can recover a lost password) When you are finished, print the page showing your SFU Computing ID and SFU Email Account. You will use this computing ID to access the computer labs on campus and use the printer in the lab. Please use your personal SFU Computing ID to log on to the computers on campus!

51

COMPUTING AT FIC FIC Info

SFU Info

FIC ID __________________________ Example (ABCDD72)

SFU # ___________________________ Example (301043306)

FIC Password ____________________

SFU COMPUTING ID ___________________________ Example (atc42) SFU Password _____________________ SFU Email ________________________



Use your FIC ID and Password to log onto the FIC portal. This has all your course information, course notes, timetable and many other features



Use your FIC ID when identifying yourself to FIC staff



The FIC portal will be your primary point of contact for ALL your studies at FIC. You will be able to use this to communicate with your instructor and other FIC staff FIC Useful Links

FIC Website http://www.fraseric.ca FIC Portal http://learning.fraseric.ca



Use your SFU ID and Password to log onto any of the computers on the SFU campus.



Use your SFU ID when using any of SFU’s web services like http://go.sfu.ca and http://my.sfu.ca



Use your SFU ID when identifying yourself to SFU staff



Use this email as your primary email for University communication

SFU Useful Links SFU SFU SFU SFU

Website http://www.sfu.ca Students http://go.sfu.ca Students http://my.sfu.ca Library http://www.lib.sfu.ca

52

Fraser International College

Computing Facilities – Conditions of Use Computing Facilities are provided to facilitate and enhance the academic program of the College. Please use the facilities subject to these conditions which are designed to keep the computing equipment operating, the accommodation in good order, and generate a productive academic environment. These conditions apply to all College computer systems and all other computing systems that can be accessed via College networks. The authority to use College computing facilities normally expires at the end of each semester but may be extended. Authorized Users Persons authorised to use College computing resources are: students enrolled in the College. staff employed at the College. other persons having special authorisation from the Managing Director or nominee. Proof of Status Your personal College identification card is proof of your enrolment status. Failure to provide the card when requested by security and /or Computer operations staff may result in your being requested to leave. Students are strongly advised to carry the College identification card at all times when they are using computer laboratory facilities. Use of Facilities You may use only those facilities for which you have been authorised. Facilities may only be used for the purpose for which they have been provided and not be used for other projects, games, hobby computing, private or consulting work. Facilities must not be wasted or consumed by inappropriate or irresponsible use. You must not attempt to tamper with any facility in any way that might alter or impede its use by others. You must not harass others including using computing facilities to send obscene, abusive, fraudulent, threatening or unnecessary repetitive messages. Proper Conduct Computer laboratories are work places. In the interest of other users noise should therefore be kept to a minimum. Eating and drinking is not permitted in computer laboratories as spilt fluids can damage the equipment, particularly keyboards and circuitry. For safety reasons children are not permitted in computer laboratories. Data Security and Privacy Passwords, when used must not be divulged to any other person. You should take every reasonable precaution to ensure that your passwords, accounts and data are adequately secured. You must not attempt to find out another user’s password, nor to gain access to another user’s account. Any computer account allocated to you is for your exclusive use. You must not allow another person to use it. Regardless of the prevailing level of security, you must not access any data or software except that which belongs to you or has been provided for your use. You must not : Attempt to examine, disclose, copy, rename, delete or modify another user’s data without their express written permission. Attempt to recover deleted data that does not belong to you. Attempt to subvert any restrictions imposed on your use of any facility. Software Copyright Regulations Software other than that already provided on the College computers must not be copied into the laboratory computers without prior authorisation from the Managing Director. Software provided for use in laboratories must not be copied from computers without prior authorisation from the Managing Director. Breaches of Conditions Failure to adhere to the above conditions will be considered an act of grave misconduct and cancellation of enrolment may result. Breaches that involve security and/or access violations may be referred to the relevant authorities. Authorised by

Bev Hudson

53

ENROLMENT FAQs ALC Students with IELTS 6.0 (minimum 6.0 in Reading and Writing bands, minimum 5.5 in Listening and Speaking bands) or equivalent are exempt from the Academic Literacy Course. ACADEMIC SUBJECT An academic subject is a subject that counts for credit at SFU. For example, ENGL101 is an academic subject. MMT100 is not an academic subject. COMPUTING ID At FIC, you need to have access to internet and computers. Your computing ID helps you log onto computers on campus. You can find instructions on how to get a computing ID in this guide. COREQUISITES The following courses have co-requisites (may only be taken at the same time) ENSC105, ENSC106 PHYS140, MATH151 (unless this course has already been completed) PHYS 141, MATH152 (unless this course has already been completed)

COURSE REPEAT POLICY A student may repeat a course no more than three times at FIC. Please note that different programs have different policies. Please see specific policies below: Program

Policy

Result of Failure

Cornerstone Program

Students who fail the Cornerstone Program may retake the course up to 1 time.

Inability to complete the program within two semesters will result in termination of studies from FIC.

Integrated Program

Students who fail the Integrated Program may re-take the course up to 1 time.

Students who fail the English program twice will be required to withdraw.

Business Program

Students will only be allowed to repeat a maximum of 2 of the 8 required courses for admission.

If you have attempted more than two repeats, your best two repeats will be used to calculate your Business admission average.

54

ENGLISH BASICS TUTORIAL One one-hour session is provided on a weekly basis. Each session consists of a short lesson focusing on a specific area of grammar or sentence structure. A priority is placed on those areas of the English language which commonly cause problems in students’ writing. ENROLMENT TIME Enrolment time is the time you are assigned to enroll in classes. Click on “Enrolment” on the student portal. Your enrolment time should be posted there about a week before enrolment begins. ENROLMENT Enrolment means to sign up for classes. Enrolment is open until the Friday of the first week of classes. After that, it is no longer possible to sign up for new classes or change your class. FIC ID Number Your FIC ID number is the number that we use to identify you at FIC. You can find your FIC ID number on your FIC Letter of Offer. Integrated Learning Skills (ILS) ILS is a course designed to help you adjust to university life and life in Canada. All students entering into UTPII must enrol in this free non-credit course. Students enrolled in ILS must maintain a minimum 80% attendance level as well as satisfactorily complete all assignments in order to pass ILS. Students who do not pass ILS will only be allowed to repeat it once and will be subject to a $500.00 fee for the course. Students who do not pass ILS are not eligible to transfer to SFU. Cornerstone and UTPI students are exempt from this course. Math Assessment Test (MAP) TEST Every student has to take the MAP test to take Math at FIC. This test will assess your math knowledge and place you in the appropriate course for your math level. MATH ENROLMENT POLICY Students in UTPI or UTPII are not allowed to take more than one Math class per semester.

55

PREREQUISITES The following courses have prerequisites: Course BUS251

Pre-requisite 9 credits of UTPII courses

CMPT128 ECON260 ENGL101/105 ENSC106 HIST204 MATH100

CMPT120 ECON1034 9 credits of UTPII courses 9 credits of UTPII courses HIST102/WL102 MAP test score Or MATH099 OR MATH101/103 MAP test score Or MATH100 Or MATH101 MATH103 MATH151 or MATH157 MAP MATH100 Or MATH101 and 103 POL100 PHYS140 9 credits of UTPII courses

MATH151

MATH152

MATH157

POL231/241 PHYS141 PSYC109

Grade 9 credits with no grade less than a CCCCD C9-19 B+ C 27 or above B B B CB 20 or above C C D CC-

UTP 2 REDUCED COURSE LOAD POLICY A full course load is 4 academic courses per semester. A minimum course load is 3 courses. Students must take the minimum course load two out of every three semesters. Students who have completed the requirements for their program may be eligible to drop below the minimum course load to 2 courses. You must complete the Course Drop Form wks 3-13 and see a Student Advisor to drop below the minimum course load. Please note that application for a reduced course load does not automatically guarantee it will be granted.

56

REDUCED COURSE LOAD POLICY- Stage 1 A full course load is 4 academic courses per semester. Students must take this course load two out of every three semesters. Students who have completed the requirements for their program may be eligible to drop below the minimum course load but must see an advisor. You must complete the Course Drop Form wks 3-13 and see a Student Advisor to drop below the minimum course load. Please note that application for a reduced course load does not automatically guarantee it will be granted. SFU EMAIL AND FIC EMAIL At FIC, you have a SFU email address and FIC Email Address. You can access your FIC email through the Student Portal. SFU ID NUMBER Your SFU ID number is your main identification at FIC and SFU. You will use it to apply to SFU. To find out your number, go to the Student Portal. Under “Student Profile” you will see all of your details. Under UNI ID, you will see a nine digit number. This is your SFU ID number. WRITING COURSE POLICY No student can enrol in more than one English or Writing course in one semester, except with prior approval. No student may be enrolled in English until they have completed three UTPII classes.

57

WQB REQUIREMENTS- update All SFU undergraduate students are required to complete at least • • • •

6 units in designated Writing (W) and, 6 units in courses designated Quantitative (Q), and 18 units in designated Breadth courses distributed among the Humanities (B-Hum), Social Sciences (B-Soc) and Sciences (B-Sci).

The following lists the WQB designations. Some courses have more than one designation and may fulfill both requirements. Please see a faculty advisor once you have transferred to SFU to ensure your course planning is accurate for timely graduation: WRITING (W) COURSES – WRITING INTENSIVE ENGL101-3 Introduction to Fiction (B-Hum) ENGL105-3 Introduction to Issues in Literature and Culture (B-Hum) PSYC109-3 Brain, Mind and Society (B-Sci) WL102-3 Literature Across Cultures QUANTITATIVE (Q) COURSES BUS251-3 Financial Accounting I CMPT120-3 Introduction to Computing Science and Programming I (B-Sci) CMPT128-3 Introduction to Computing Science and Programming II ECON103-4 Principles of Microeconomics (B-Soc) ECON105-4 Principles of Macroeconomics (B-Soc) ECON260-3 Environmental Economics FPA184-3 Sound MACM101-3 Discrete Mathematics I (B-Sci) MATH100-3 Precalculus MATH151-3 Calculus I MATH152-3 Calculus II MATH157-3 Calculus for the Social Sciences I PHIL001-3 Critical Thinking PHYS140-4 Studio Physics – Mechanics & Modern Physics (B-Sci) PHYS141-4 Studio Physics – Optics, Electricity & Magnetism (B-Sci) STAT203-3 Intro to Statistics for the Social Sciences

BREADTH (B) COURSES

58

Students must take 6 units each of Humanities (B-Hum), Social Sciences (B-Soc), and Science (B-Sci). HUMANITIES: (B-HUM) ENGL101-3 Introduction to Fiction (W) ENGL105-3 Introduction to Issues in Literature and Culture (W) FNST101-3 The Cultures, Languages and Origins of Canada’s First Peoples HIST102-3 Canada since Confederation HIST204-3 The Social History of Canada WL102-3 Literature Across Cultures WL201-3 East/West SCIENCE: (B-SCI) BISC100-4 Introduction to Biology CMPT120-3 Introduction to Computing Science and Programming I (Q) BPK140-3 Contemporary Health Issues MACM101-3 Discrete Mathematics I (Q) PHYS140-4 Studio Physics – Mechanics and Modern Physics (Q) PHYS141-4 Studio Physics – Optics, Electricity & Magnetism (Q) PSYC109-3 Brain, Mind and Society (W) SOCIAL SCIENCES: (B-SOC) CMNS110-3 Introduction to Communication Studies CRIM101-3 Introduction to Criminology CRIM135-3 Introduction to Canadian Law and Legal Institutions: A Criminal Justice Perspective ECON103-4 Principles of Microeconomics (Q) ECON105-4 Principles of Macroeconomics (Q) GEOG100-3 Society, Space, Environment: Introducing Human Geography HSCI160-3 Global Perspectives on Health LING110-3 Wonder of Words * LING220-3 Introduction to Linguistics POL100-3 Introduction to Politics and Government POL231-3 Comparative Politics POL241-3 Introduction to International Politics PSYC100-3 Introduction to Psychology I PSYC102-3 Introduction to Psychology II

59

A grade of C- or better is required to earn W, Q, or B credits. *Note: Students who have taken LING110 in 200903 or prior will NOT receive BSoc designation. For more information, please refer to SFU website: http://www.sfu.ca/ugcr/For_Students/WQB_Requirements/